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Waylon Allen
Waylon Allen

Shiva The Legends Of The Immorta [EXCLUSIVE]


Of all the Masters through the ages, there is one acknowledged Master who has been referred to in the ancient scriptures, in legends and mystic tales, in passing mention by many renowned masters. Mentioned in the Puranas and other scriptures, he is known as Guru Gorakhnath. The Nath Sampradaya, among many others, revere him as Shiva Goraksha.




Shiva The Legends Of The Immorta



There are innumerable legends about Guru Gorakhnath, though there are no records of when he was born, where he hails from, or any historical facts associated with events in his life. He is mentioned in reference to Adi Shankaracharya who lived in the eighth century. He is also associated with Kabir in the fifteenth century.


Of all the Masters through the ages, there is one acknowledged Master who has been referred to in the ancient scriptures, in legends and mystic tales, in passing mention by many renowned masters. Mentioned in the Puranas and other scriptures, he is known as Guru Gorakhnath. The Nath Sampradaya, among many others, revere him as Shiva Goraksha.


There are innumerable legends about Guru Gorakhnath, though there are no records of when he was born, where he hails from, or any historical facts associated with events in his life. He is mentioned in reference to Adi Shankaracharya who lived in the eighth century. He is also associated with Kabir in the fifteenth century.


This legend is of great importance both in Saivite and Vaishnavite system of beliefs. The devas and the asuras (gods and demons) united in their efforts to churn the celestial ocean of milk (ksheerasaagaram), in quest of Amrita (the nectar of life and immortality). This mammoth task was carried out with the Mandara Mount as the churning stick and the mythological snake Vasuki as the rope.


The legend does not end here. Their obstacle out of the way, the devas and asuras continued to churn the ocean in quest of their ultimate goal, and were rewarded with the spectacle of the divine physician Dhanvantari emerging out of the ocean with a pot bearing the celestial nectar. A fierce tussle followed between the gods and the demons over the issue of sharing the nectar of immortality. Vishnu the protector of good intervened, took the form of an enchantress Mohini, appeared on the spot, charmed the asuras, and served all of the nectar to the devas, and thereby protected the universe from the calamity that would have occurred if the asuras had attained immortality.


The legend still does not end here. Two of the asuras, aware of Mohini's trickery took the guise of devas and begot a dose of the nectar from her. Vishnu discovered their act, only when they had consumed half their portion of Amrita, and proceded to destroy them. Protected by the nectar of immortality, the demons took the form of Rahu and Ketu. Rahu with a snakes head and a human body, and Ketu with a human head and a snake's body are regarded as celestial bodies - shadow planets, or the node positions at which eclipses are caused. Rahu is the ascending node while Ketu is the descending node. Popular belief has it that eclipses are caused when Rahu or Ketu swallow the moon or the sun.


Another legend says that Shambhala or Siddhashram exists in an isolated time bubble. It means when you are in it, you time travel into a different period. Almost like there is no concept of space and time, and those who wish or are meant to stay here become immortal (as a conscious or physically, is not known), meaning there is no death in Gyanganj.


A spiritual leader, Guru Sai Kaka, revealed to the world about his many visits to Gyanganj. This has been one of the strongest claims, as claims to have sought spiritual and immortal teachings there. He shared that during his every visit, a sage escorted him to Gyanganj. He emphasized that the kingdom exists, but on an entirely different plane or a higher dimension.


His first big success--published in 1916, and translated by C. D. Godwin in 1991 as The Three Leaps of WangLun--was inspired by a momentous episode in Chinese history, a popular uprising against the Qing (Manchu) dynasty in the eighteenth century. Here, Doblin drew extensively on historical sources for the details that would create those Barthesian "effects of the real" that persuade a reader to accept the events depicted as authentic. But a full decade before Berlin Alexanderplatz's vibrant evocation of city life and colourful montage of textual fragments, both contemporary and traditional, he also published Wadzeks Kampf mit der Dampfturbine (1918; Wadzek's Fight against the Steam Turbine, 2020), a burlesque account of the decline into ignominy of a feckless Berlin businessman that draws freely on the comic effects of silent film, including slow-motion sequences, grotesque perspectives and slapstick. In Manas (1927), Doblin drew not so much on the detail as on the imaginative idiom of Hindu myth as a means of exploring postwar social tensions within an overall sense of cosmic order. But in his last novel, Hamlet oder Die lange Nacht nimmt ein Ende (1945-6; Tales of a Long Night, 1984), myths and legends provide the medium in which members of a family articulate the often uncomfortable nature of their relationships....


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